Theoretical PhD in statistics (non-financial)

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Theoretical PhD in statistics (non-financial)

Postby dandar » Wed Feb 29, 2012 2:12 pm

Hi Mark

I basically just wanted to ask a question about my background and whether you think I would be considered for a entry level quant job in London.

My background is that I have a MSc in statistics, and will soon complete my PhD in statistics, both from the same London university which is in the top 5-10 UK universities (depending on what ranking one consults and when). My MSc focused on applied statistics, and was quite general, so it did not have many financial applications. My PhD is focusing on a general type of model with many areas of application, but unfortunatley not financial ones. The focus is theoretical however, so there is quite a lot of asymptotic theory for proving convergence results etc, and measure theory. I will also be 35 years old when I finish, and I am wondering if this is a problem. Due to my advanced years however I have a reasonable amount of experience programming in C# and C++ (.NET version however). I am wondering if I boost my knowledge with, as advised many times on this site, stochastic calculus, PDEs and/or practice implementing your C++ code examples, whether I might be considered for a quant job.

Any help would be much appreciated.
dandar
 
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Re: Theoretical PhD in statistics (non-financial)

Postby mj » Wed Feb 29, 2012 10:52 pm

I suspect they'd more look at an applied statistician for algorithmic trading roles. Are you any good at time series?

If you are good at measure theory you ought to be able to get into a derivatives pricing type role as well.
mj
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Re: Theoretical PhD in statistics (non-financial)

Postby dandar » Thu Mar 01, 2012 7:04 am

Thanks Mark for your answer. I do have a time-series element to my PhD, but it is not the main focus. It is good to hear that perhaps a strong knowledge of measure theory may be a path into derivatives pricing, presumably because the theory of risk neutral pricing involves things like Brownian motion which are measure-theoretic?

Thanks for taking the time to answer.
dandar
 
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Joined: Wed Feb 29, 2012 9:23 am


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